CategoriesHiking Guide

Hiking Grand Canyon National Park

Hiking Grand Canyon National Park

This list of trails is just a short sampling of the hikes you can do in the Grand Canyon. For more hiking information please check out these websites. 

•Day Hikes – National Park Service
•Backcountry Hiking – National Park Service
•All Trails

 

Bright Angel Trail

 

Bright Angel Trail to Plateau Point 

Distance / 12 miles RT
Time / 2 days
Elevation Gain / 3,110 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Strenuous
Trailhead / Bright Angel Trailhead

 
Bright Angel Trail to 3 Mile Resthouse

Distance / 6 miles RT
Time / 3 hours
Elevation Gain / 2,102 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Moderate
Trailhead / Bright Angel Trailhead

The Bright Angel Trail is the most popular trail on the South Rim—and with good reason. Starting near several popular hotels, it provides convenient access below the rim, offering dramatic views of the Inner Canyon. Although steep and challenging, it’s well-maintained and makes a terrific introduction to Inner Canyon hiking. You can also choose to turn around at the Mile-and-a-half Resthouse or Three Mile resthouse. Restrooms are on the trail as well as shelters. Seasonal trail water (May – September) Multiple distance options available. Out and back trail.

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South Kaibab Trail

South Kaibab Trail to Cedar Ridge

Distance / 3 miles RT
Time / 4 hours
Elevation Gain / 1,140 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Strenuous
Trailhead / Yaki Point

 

South Kaibab Trail to Skeleton Point

Distance / 6 miles RT
Time / 2 days
Elevation Gain / 5,200 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Strenuous
Trailhead / Yaki Point

A less crowded alternative to the Bright Angel Trail. It’s one of two main routes to the canyon floor. While most Inner Canyon trails follow side canyons, the South Kaibab Trail follows open ridgelines, providing spectacular views in all directions, which is great for day hikers. Trailhead access by shuttle bus only. Trail is rated strenuous. Multiple distance options available. Out and back trail.

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Rim Trail

 

Distance / 12 miles one way
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Easy
Trailhead / Multiple Stops along the shuttle route

The one truly level trail on the South Rim, it runs for 12 mostly paved miles with outstanding views along the way. Easy trail access at 14 viewpoints between Hermits Rest and Pipe Creek Vista. NO water along trail.

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Hermit Trail

 

Hermit Trail to Santa Maria Spring

Distance / 5 miles RT
Time / 4 hours
Elevation Gain / 1,760 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Strenuous
Trailhead / Hermits Rest

 

Hermit Trail to Colorado River

Distance / 15.9 miles RT
Time / 2 days
Elevation Gain / 5,052 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Strenuous
Trailhead / Hermits Rest

The Hermit trail is one of the South Rim’s best hikes. Departing from Hermits Rest, it treats hikers to spectacular western vistas as it descends to the Colorado River in two steep drops. The first drop of around 2000 ft takes you to the shade and wild grapevines at Santa Maria Spring. The Spring, 2.5 miles below the rim offers year round spring water. Restricted access to the Hermit’s Road/Trailhead occurs annually from March 1 through November 30. Backpackers with a valid backcountry permit for the Hermit or Boucher Trails are allowed access during this time. Trail is rated strenuous. Multiple distance options available. Down and back trail.

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Havasu Falls

Distance / 20 miles RT
Time / 2 days
Elevation Gain / 3448 ft. climb 
Route Type / Out and Back
Rating / Strenuous
Trailhead
Hualapai Hilltop

Known as the Garden of Eden in the desert, Havasu Falls is one of the most well-known waterfalls in the world. The turquoise waters are the crowning glory of the Havasupai Indian Reservation, this breathtaking attraction is found at the bottom of the Grand Canyon near Supia, Arizona. Start you hike E A R L Y ! Like 4AM early. Some people camp in their cars in the parking lot to get an early start. There is no fee to camp in the parking lot but the trailhead at Hualapai Hilltop has no services.

When to go to Havasu Falls

Spring + Late Fall
Pros: Less bugs and less people
Cons: Variable weather could mean less than ideal swimming temps.

Summer + Early Fall
Pros: Hot weather means you can sit and hang out in the water all day
Cons: Hot temps mean hiking could be miserable. In the heat of summer, when Havasu Falls is the busiest, people get up at 4am to begin the hike out. Summer is also monsoon season with flash floods being most likely from mid June to late September.

RESERVATIONS

Reservations for camping and hotels are sometimes booked 6 months in advance. They release reservations on February 1st. You have to book reservation through the Havasupai Tribe website. theofficialhavasupaitribe.com

FEES (2018 pricing)

Pricing for 2018 is as follows and includes all necessary permits, fees, and taxes:
One Person, 2 Days / 1 Night: $140.56
One Person, 3 Days / 2 Nights: $171.11
One Person, 4 Days / 3 Nights: $201.67

PACK HORSE FEES

$132.00 one way, $264.00 round trip per pack horse

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